Helsinki Final Agreement

– regular agreements or programmes concerning the organisation of student exchanges, international youth seminars, vocational training courses and the teaching of foreign languages; Helsinki Agreement, also known as the Helsinki Final Act (1 August 1975), an important diplomatic agreement signed in Helsinki, Finland, at the end of the first Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE, now the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe). The Helsinki Accords were above all an attempt to ease tensions between the Soviet and Western blocs by ensuring their common acceptance of the status quo in Europe after the Second World War. The agreements were signed by all European countries (with the exception of Albania, signed in September 1991), as well as by the United States and Canada. The agreement recognised the inviolability of borders in Europe after the Second World War and committed the 35 signatory states to respect human rights and fundamental freedoms and to cooperate in economic, scientific, humanitarian and other fields. The Helsinki Agreements are not binding and have no contractual status. In the months leading up to the conclusion of the negotiations and the signing of the Helsinki Final Act, American public opinion, especially Eastern Americans, expressed concern that the agreement would mean the adoption of Soviet domination over Eastern Europe and the integration of the Baltic states into the USSR. President Ford also expressed concern about this and asked the U.S. National Security Council to clarify this issue. [7] The US Senate has also expressed concern about the fate of the Baltic States and the CSCE in general. Several senators have written to President Ford requesting that the final phase of the summit be postponed until all issues are resolved in a manner favorable to the West.

[8] Reaffirming that such cooperation can be developed and implemented bilaterally and multilaterally at the national and non-governmental levels, for example through intergovernmental and other agreements, international programmes, cooperation projects and trade channels, also using various forms of contacts, including direct and individual contacts, his assurances have had little effect. . . .